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Exercise Recommendations in Primary Care: A Quality Improvement Initiative

By | News, Training | 5 Comments

By Jordan Feigenbaum, Emily Sanchez, Brandon Schabacker, and Movicque King Updated 3/30/2016 Readers, I’m posting part of a quality improvement project I’ve been working on that I’ve referenced in an upcoming interview. I’m putting this on the website so people can access it, if needed, in the hopes that exercise- specifically resistance training and high intensity interval training will become more widely recommended at the doctor’s office. That said, this article by no means encompasses my thoughts on optimizing exercise recommendations in the primary care setting. Rather, those thoughts will be fully fleshed out in detail at a later date….

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GainzZz™ in Clinical Practice Part IV

By | Nutrition, Training | 5 Comments

By Austin Baraki Sorry for the delay, folks! I’ve been busy graduating from medical school :). We’ve made it to the fourth, final, and most important article in our series. Before we begin, let’s briefly review what we’ve covered so far. In our first article we defined sarcopenia as a loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength/performance, and discussed the mechanisms that contribute to muscle protein breakdown. In part II we showed how to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS). We then looked at how this translates into muscle hypertrophy, and proved that “it’s never too late” – no matter how…

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Survey for an App

By | Potpourri | No Comments

Hey everyone! I’m working on a cool (to me) project that would be helpful for tracking nutritional parameters in a more user friendly way than what’s currently available. If you get a second, please fill out the survey below: http://goo.gl/forms/wSoqUNCo82

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GainzZz™ in Clinical Practice: Part III

By | Training | One Comment

By Austin Baraki In our first article we defined sarcopenia as a loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, and discussed how disuse, poor nutrition, neuromuscular changes, hormonal status, and chronic inflammation contribute to loss of skeletal muscle protein. In part 2 we explored a few mechanisms that stimulate muscle protein synthesis including resistance exercise, dietary protein (especially leucine), and several hormones/cytokines. We then showed how this process translates into muscle hypertrophy, with consequences for the atrophic/elderly population that proved “it’s never too late!” Today we’ll examine a few factors influencing skeletal muscle “quality,” then discuss the clinical diagnosis of…

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12 Ways To Skin The Texas Method

By | Training, Weightlifting | 115 Comments

By Jordan Feigenbaum The Texas Method may be one of the most popular intermediate training programs in existence. Developed by happenstance in Texas (duh) and popularized as a follow-up program to Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength Novice Progression (seen here), it’s based on a three-day split that is originally structured as follows: Week 1 Day 1 (Volume Day) Day 2 (Light Day) Day 3 (Intensity Day) Squat x 5 x 5 Bench x 5 x 5 Deadlift x 5 x 1 Squat x 5 x 2 @ 80% of Day 1 Press x 5 x 3 Chins x max reps x…

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GainzZz™ in Clinical Practice Part II

By | News, Nutrition | One Comment

By Austin Baraki In our first article we defined sarcopenia as a loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. We discussed how disuse, poor nutrition, neuromuscular changes, hormonal status, and chronic inflammation contribute to loss of skeletal muscle protein. In today’s article we’ll examine the other side of the equation that affect skeletal muscle protein synthesis (a.k.a. gainzZz™), and how this manifests as hypertrophy. This article is probably the longest and most science-heavy of the series, but bear with me – it does build towards a practical conclusion! [Before we begin, I’d like to make a clarification and correction from…

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GainzZz™ in Clinical Practice: Part I

By | News, Nutrition, Training | One Comment

This article begins a multi-part series discussing the growing problem of sarcopenia in our aging population. We will discuss our current understanding of sarcopenia, ways to identify it, and how to treat (and hopefully, prevent) it most effectively. This series is meant to complement this fantastic lecture given by Dr. Jonathon Sullivan (M.D., Starting Strength Coach), in which he presented his model of the “Sick Aging Phenotype” characterized by 1) sarcopenia/frailty, 2) the metabolic syndrome, and 3) polypharmacy/medical dependence. It is highly recommended that you watch his lecture in addition to this article, which will focus primarily on the first…

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5 Fitness Myths That Need to Die

By | Potpourri | 18 Comments

By Jordan Feigenbaum MS, Starting Strength Staff, CSCS, HFS, USAW Club Coach After explaining these same issues over and over again literally hundreds of times in great detail, I figured I’d put up an abridged version for the ADHD/4 hour work week crowd. These 5 common fallacies have been around too damn long and they need to die a quick death like mini discs, the Pontiac Aztec,  and competitive aerobics (this actually may still be going on, see non-competitive “CrossFit*” Insulin is the devil. Insulin gets a bad rap from the carbophobes, particularly those in the self-educated blogger demographic. Most…

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The Pendulum of Specificity Part III: Hypertrophy

By | Training | 8 Comments

By Jordan Feigenbaum MS Anatomy and Physiology, Starting Strength Staff,  HFS, CSCS, USAW Club Coach In part three of this series, we’re going to discuss the practical application of the previous two concepts we discussed, e.g. training specificity and fatigue, to an outcome hypertrophy. Hypertrophy refers to the increased size of a tissue and in our application of training stress to the human’s musculoskeletal system, we’re referring to hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle is fairly unique as far as tissues go as evidenced by its histology (microscopic anatomy). You see, most tissues in the body are comprised of cells that…

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The Pendulum of Specificity Part II: Fatigue

By | Training | 6 Comments

By Jordan Feigenbaum MS Anatomy and Physiology, Starting Strength Staff,  HFS, CSCS, USAW Club Coach In part two of this series, we’re going to discus the concept of fatigue and review what we’ve learned so far (you can read the first part here). As always, we’ll start out by defining our terms so we can be sure of the actual discussion taking place. First, let’s define fatigue. According to Webster’s, Fatigue means :   weariness or exhaustion from labor, exertion, or stress;   the temporary loss of power to respond that is induced in a sensory receptor or motor end…

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