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Nutrition

Handling Hunger

By | Nutrition | 4 Comments

If you’ve ever tried to lose weight, have ever missed a meal, or have even just driven by your favorite bakery…chances are you’ve experienced hunger. Hunger can be annoying, distracting, and is frequently blamed as “diet derailing,” yet it’s part of our normal physiology and something that can’t be avoided entirely. Background Hunger is defined as a feeling of discomfort caused by lack of food, followed by a desire to eat. Conversely, satiety is the feeling of being full and no longer desiring a meal. Hunger and satiety both stem from the interactions of biological, psychological, and social factors, which…

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Nutrition Science, Part IV – Moving Forward: Improving the approach

By | Nutrition | No Comments

It is important to note that the assumptions discussed in the last article are not arbitrary to the biomedical model, but legitimized through common sense in the context of a given research topic (32). A common-sense approach to nutrition, therefore, is one which can legitimize a modified approach to scientific inquiry into diet-disease relationships. Although not exhaustive, a number of potential features and alternatives could modify the approach. The first is to move away from the narrow focus on isolated nutrients/compounds, to emphasizing food as the exposure of interest and design “whole-diet” interventions which reflect that the fundamental unit in…

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Nutrition Science, Part III – The Awkward Fit: RCTs and Nutrition Science

By | Nutrition | One Comment

In the second part of this article series we discussed the utility, limitations, and misconceptions related to the prospective cohort design for nutrition science. As discussed in part I, the reductionist biomedical model and its gold standard randomized controlled trial (RCT) is ill-equipped for studying complex dietary patterns in a way that can effectively inform public policy. In this article we will examine the randomized controlled nutrition trial design in more detail. ..there are fundamental differences between the subject of inquiry for which the RCT model evolved to investigate (drugs) and the subject of inquiry to which it is now…

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Nutrition Science, Part II: The Prospective Cohort Design

By | Nutrition | No Comments

In the first article in this series we discussed the history of nutrition science and traced its evolution alongside the biomedical model. We also introduced the discussion of nutritional epidemiology in comparison to the “gold standard” biomedical trial design: the randomized controlled trial. In this second article, we’ll discuss the utility, limitations, and misunderstandings about the prospective cohort study design for nutrition science. Prospective cohort studies are the only practical research design to investigate the long-term relationship between diet and disease, particularly with the preponderance of current evidence in nutrition indicating that whole diet patterns are more informative of diet-disease…

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Nutrition Science, Part I: How Did We Get Here?

By | Nutrition | 4 Comments

Introduction To anyone versed in biomedicine, the so-called “hierarchy of evidence” is well-established and unquestioned. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (RCT) is considered the gold standard trial design, because it offers the ability to randomly allocate a treatment, minimize potential sources of bias, and compare the exposure or intervention of interest to a placebo. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this model, or this hierarchy … if the subject of inquiry is pharmaceutical drugs or the molecular mechanisms of disease. At its core, the biomedical model is based on a presupposition that all disease can be studied with such a reductionist…

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How To Measure Your Waist Correctly

By | Nutrition | 23 Comments

If you’ve been paying attention to our latest podcasts, articles, Q/A’s, and other content then you’ve likely heard us discuss the importance of waist circumference in determining who is a good candidate for weight gain and who could stand to lose a bit of weight. Waist circumference is a quick, low-cost piece of data with reams of scientific evidence relating the distance around your abdomen with health outcomes like premature death, diabetes, heart disease, stroke risk, etc. While the aforementioned disease processes have many variables contributing to their development and burden, we have large, well-designed studies showing that males and…

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Does YOUR metabolism change with weight loss?

By | Nutrition | 6 Comments

Yes. Your metabolism changes when you lose weight. Some of these changes are good, e.g. decreased fasting blood sugar, improved cholesterol measures, decreased storage of fat in places you don’t want it like your liver and waist, etc. Not all of the metabolic changes are good however, and in recent times there has been much discussion and handwringing over the role of metabolic adaptation (sometimes referred to as “metabolic damage”) in the setting of weight loss. The idea is, given that body mass is controlled by the balance of energy expenditure versus energy intake, that in periods of caloric restriction,…

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Barbell Medicine QuickStart Guide

By | Nutrition, Training | 3 Comments

Updated 5.29.2019 Introduction Welcome to the Barbell Medicine Quick-Start Guide. Whether you’re here for the first time or a long time reader, thanks for joining us. We’re hopeful that this resource will be useful for you and we’re pumped that you’re here and ready to make some changes to your training and nutrition! First, what is Barbell Medicine? Barbell Medicine is comprised of: Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, MS Austin Baraki,MD Leah Lutz Alan Thrall Vanessa Burman, RD Jessica Griffith RN Tom Campitelli Michael Ray, DC Derek Miles, DPT Charlie Dickson, DPTc Alex Kovaleski, PTA Hassan Mansour Mark Stanwyck The company was…

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From the Newsletter: A Word on Salt

By | Nutrition | 6 Comments

If you’re reading this, please raise your hand if you’ve heard the phrase “Americans eat too much salt” or, alternatively, that we should “cut back our salt intake”? Show of hands? Ah, yes- seems like everyone has heard that or even possibly said that perhaps. However, what does the evidence say about salt intake and chronic disease? The current World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation is that we take in 2000-2400mg of sodium per day, with some organizations like the American Heart Association suggesting that we should take in <2000mg of sodium per day. For reference, sodium and salt are not…

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Q/A with Dr. Baraki and Dr. Feigenbaum

By | Nutrition, Training | 3 Comments

    Dr. Feigenbaum:                Hey, welcome back to the Barbell Medicine Podcast. I’m Dr. Feigenbaum, I’m joined here with Dr. Baraki. This is another Q&A episode, and we like doing these things- Dr. Baraki:                              Or episodes. Dr. Feigenbaum:                Episodes, potentially. [00:00:30] We have a lot of questions to get through, so we’re going to have a slightly different format this time. What I will do, is I will play moderator, the first tank-top wearing moderator that the internet has ever seen, and I will read the question. I’m going to give Dr. Baraki one minute to respond, I have a…

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